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Association Leaders Speak Out on Health System Change

January/February 1997
Health Affairs, vol.16, no.1 (January/February 1997): 150-157
Janet M. Corrigan, Paul B. Ginsburg

Abstract:

eaders of 15 national professional organizations and trade associations were interviewed about developments in the health care industry. There was general consensus that change is inevitable and that private purchasers of health insurance, especially very large companies, have played an important role in many of the changes. Other significant developments include changes in medical practice and technology, as well as increasingly sophisticated clinical information systems. The leaders expressed enthusiasm about the potential of managed care, and they recognized the importance of providing consumers with a choice of insurance products. Also important were the trend toward horizontal integration and downsizing of hospitals, the changing role of academic medical centers, the movement of physicians into group practice and the growing numbers of uninsured and underinsured.

For a full copy please visit Health Affairs

 

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